ITI News Archive

Stanford Medicine News

  • Gummy phlegm and COVID-19

    Levels of a stringy, spongy substance soar in the sputum of COVID-19 patients requiring intubation, accounting for at least some of their breathing trouble. Development of an off-patent drug may prevent it.

  • Stanford Medicine provides monkeypox test

    Stanford Medicine now provides a test for the monkeypox virus. Rapid identification of infected people will help combat the virus’s spread and facilitate patient care.

  • COVID vaccine approved for young kids

    Children as young as 6 months can now receive the Pfizer BioNTech and Moderna mRNA vaccines.

  • Immunosuppression-free kidney transplant

    Using a method they developed for stem cell transplants, a Stanford team has enabled children with immune disorders to receive a new immune system and a matching kidney from a parent.

  • Jeffrey Glenn receives $69 million grant

    Stanford Medicine’s SyneRx will develop drugs to fight viral pathogens with high pandemic potential, including the one that causes COVID-19.

  • 1,000+genes linked to severe COVID-19

    Using machine learning, researchers from Stanford Medicine and their collaborators found specific genetic signals in people who develop severe coronavirus infection.

  • What to know about monkeypox

    The monkeypox virus is normally endemic to Africa but has recently been found on other continents. It spreads through prolonged, direct contact with infected people or their bedding, clothing and towels.

  • Bacteria that digest breast milk in decline

    Stanford Medicine researchers and colleagues found that as nations industrialize, a species of bacteria critical in the early development of infant gut microbiomes fades away.

  • Microbiologist Hugh McDevitt dies at 91

    The Stanford immunologist’s research on how our immune cells recognize pathogens — and what happens when this process goes wrong — paved the way to modern immunology.

  • ‘Remote-controlled’ CAR-T cell therapy safer

    Stanford researchers modified anti-cancer CAR-T cells so they can be controlled with an oral drug. The modified cells are safer, more potent and more active against solid tumors in mice.