ITI News Archive

Stanford Medicine News

  • No Paxlovid benefit seen for long COVID

    Paxlovid, effective in preventing severe COVID-19, didn’t appear to help long-COVID patients in this single-center study. But further research may show benefits with different doses or for people with specific symptoms.

  • A.C. Matin dies at 83

    The microbiologist, on the faculty for nearly half a century, studied a wide range of topics, including antibiotic resistance, cancer, and bacteria as an agent for cleaning up toxic chemicals.

  • Wes Brown dies at 63

    Brown developed stem-cell therapies for patients who suffered infections after receiving blood or bone marrow transplants.

  • Pump for kids’ failing hearts

    A new type of surgically implanted pump that can support a child’s failing heart has passed the first stage of human testing in a Stanford Medicine-led trial.

  • Unexpected cells may spread COVID-19

    A previously overlooked type of immune cell allows SARS-CoV-2 to proliferate, Stanford Medicine scientists have found. The discovery has important implications for preventing severe COVID-19.

  • One treatment improves vaccine response

    Those with aging immune systems struggle to fight off novel viruses and respond weakly to vaccination. Stanford Medicine researchers were able to revitalize the immune system in mice.

  • Who needs regular COVID-19 boosters?

    A study led by researchers at Stanford Medicine finds the benefit of frequent booster vaccination for COVID-19 is highest for those over 65 years and the immunocompromised.

  • Drug lowers food allergy risk

    A drug that binds to allergy-causing antibodies can protect children from dangerous reactions to accidentally eating allergy-triggering foods, a Stanford Medicine-led study found.

  • Why young kids don’t get severe COVID

    Children’s noses pack a punch that could help explain COVID-19’s typically mild course in young kids. Researchers hope to parlay that ‘nasal magic’ into increased protections for adults.

  • Drug boosts nerve growth, muscle strength

    A drug that boosts strength in injured or aging mice restores connections between nerves and muscle and suggests ways to combat weakness in humans due to aging, injury or disease.