ITI News Archive

Stanford Medicine News

  • Drug lowers food allergy risk

    A drug that binds to allergy-causing antibodies can protect children from dangerous reactions to accidentally eating allergy-triggering foods, a Stanford Medicine-led study found.

  • Why young kids don’t get severe COVID

    Children’s noses pack a punch that could help explain COVID-19’s typically mild course in young kids. Researchers hope to parlay that ‘nasal magic’ into increased protections for adults.

  • Drug boosts nerve growth, muscle strength

    A drug that boosts strength in injured or aging mice restores connections between nerves and muscle and suggests ways to combat weakness in humans due to aging, injury or disease.

  • William Robinson, pioneering virologist

    Hard-driving molecular virologist who used ‘advanced chemistry to unlock the tightly held secrets of viruses’ was also a hearty mountain man, scaling peaks in Alaska and Nepal.

  • Screening for chronic kidney disease

    Many people don’t know they have chronic kidney disease until it progresses. A new study by Stanford Medicine researchers finds that screening would increase life expectancy in a cost-effective way.

  • Beating-heart transplant

    Surgeons at Stanford Medicine believe the new technique, which has now been performed on six patients, will improve health outcomes for recipients and boost the pool of available organs.

  • New COVID-19 vaccine

    In a study led by Stanford Medicine researchers, a low-cost COVID-19 vaccine that does not require refrigeration provided immunity in rhesus monkeys for one year.

  • First abdominal wall transplant in state

    The 22-year-old patient had waited years for an intestinal transplant. At Stanford Medicine, a combined intestinal and abdominal wall transplant gave him an even better option.

  • mRNA vaccine beats infection

    Stanford Medicine researchers have shown that prior SARS-CoV-2 infection reduces killer T cells’ response to vaccination. These cells are crucial for eliminating the virus from the body.

  • Osteoarthritis linked to allergic inflammation

    A connection found between asthma, eczema and osteoarthritis indicates that drugs to treat allergic conditions could be used in future studies aimed at slowing the progression of osteoarthritis.