ITI News Archive

Stanford Medicine News

  • How COVID-19 virus infects nasal cells

    A discovery by Stanford Medicine researchers and colleagues may pave the way for a “morning after” or prophylactic nasal spray to prevent infection.

  • Blood test identifies infections

    A diagnostic test developed by Stanford Medicine scientists can separate bacterial and viral infections with 90% accuracy, the first to meet standards set by the World Health Organization.

  • Liver exchange eases shortage of organs

    A rare three-way exchange of liver transplants in Pakistan was made possible with a new algorithm developed by a Stanford Medicine student.

  • Mice with diabetes regain blood sugar control

    A technique developed at Stanford Medicine allows mice with diabetes to accept unmatched islet cells and durably restores blood sugar control without immunosuppression or graft-versus-host disease.

  • Predicting immunity from vaccination

    A gene signature seen in antibody-producing cells in the blood of vaccinated study participants could expedite vaccine development.

  • What to know about polio

    The first polio case in the U.S. since 2013 emerged in July, and cases have increased abroad. Yvonne Maldonado answers questions about the virus and its impacts.

  • What to know about monkeypox

    The monkeypox virus is normally endemic to Africa but has recently been found on other continents. It spreads through prolonged, direct contact with infected people or their bedding, clothing and towels.

  • Viral genome packing key in replication

    Disrupting a virus’s genome packaging can halt replication and jumpstart a natural immune response against subsequent exposures, a Stanford Medicine study finds.

  • Cancer tolerated by immune system

    Cancer cells in the lymph nodes trick the immune system into tolerating their presence and welcoming metastasis, a pair of Stanford studies find. Blocking this process could stop cancer’s spread.

  • Reshuffling liver transplant waitlist

    An updated scoring system developed by Stanford Medicine researchers will more accurately prioritize patients on the liver transplant waiting list based on medical urgency.